Resources

11. Usage of Natural Resources

11. The company discloses the extent to which natural resources are used for the company’s business activities. Possible options here are materials, the input and output of water, soil, waste, energy, emissions, land and biodiversity as well as emissions for the life cycles of products and services.

The use of natural resources is essential for the operation of Munich Airport, resulting in particular in carbon emissions, air pollutants, and aircraft noise.

With its environmental goal of achieving carbon-neutral growth by 2020, FMG has committed itself to improving the efficient use of resources and reducing emissions and the influence of pollutants. In order to achieve this goal, a Group-wide carbon reduction project was set up in 2009 with three fields of action: sustainable energy supply, increased energy efficiency in the use of energy sources, and sustainable construction. Furthermore, extensive compensating measures are applied to protect the natural soils and biological diversity.

FMG has its own Environmental Management division which publishes environmental declarations in accordance with DIN ISO 14001 and EMAS. These declarations provide an overview of FMG’s resource consumption levels, information on the environment management system, details on the areas of climate protection, energy, air pollution control, aircraft noise, and water management, and list FMG’s environmental goals and measures.

One of the most important elements of carbon management is the in-house carbon database, which is used as a report, management, and control tool for all activities related to the area of carbon reduction and energy efficiency. FMG has been publishing its carbon footprint in its environmental declarations in accordance with the requirements of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol since 2008.

FMG is not only aiming to reduce emissions that are a direct (scope 1) and indirect (scope 2) result of its own business activities, it also supports third-party users in reducing their emissions. Scope 3 is responsible for over 80% of the total emissions on the airport campus and covers emissions produced by companies located at the airport, such as airlines (the landing and take-off cycle covers emissions up to 3,000 feet), or public transportation. In its bid to reduce emissions, FMG offers specific incentives and innovative solutions, e.g., emissions-based landing charges, ground-based pre-conditioned air units for heating and cooling the aircraft, or continuous descent operations (CDO), a noise-reduced approach procedure.

See also:
"Strengths 2014" - Integrated Annual Report, p. 61-71.
2014 environmental declaration

12. Resource Management

12. The company discloses what qualitative and quantitative goals it has set itself with regard to its resource efficiency, its use of renewables, the increase in raw material productivity and the reduction in the usage of ecosystem services, and how these goals have been met or will be met in the future.

The sustainability program, which is outlined in the annual integrated report, lists the goals for the environmental and climate protection field of action. These goals go towards achieving the higher level mission statement of achieving carbon-neutral growth by 2020 (based on 160,000 tonnes per year in 2005).

These goals include:
• Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, for example by using more regenerative heat
• Measuring and reducing air pollutants and noise emissions, for example by conducting mobile noise measurements and applying a noise-reduced landing approach
• Energy efficiency and the conservation of resources, for example green IT, recycling and process optimization, energy-efficient and sustainable construction, increased system efficiency
• Improved environmental management, for example by certifying additional subsidiaries

Positive results of the carbon reduction project: since 2009, FMG has been able to continuously reduce carbon emissions from all systems, buildings, and vehicles, upon which FMG has a direct influence. Despite expansion and a 2.77% increase in passenger figures, greenhouse gas emissions were reduced by 3% (4,242 tonnes) from 152,000 to 148,000 tonnes between 2013 and 2014.

See also:
"Strengths 2014" - Integrated Annual Report, p. 162-192.

Key Performance Indicators (KPI)

Key Performance Indicator GRI EN1
Materials used by weight or volume.

De-icers 2013/2014:
Apron de-icers: 1,097 t
Aircraft de-icer (Safewing Type I): 1,939 m³
Aircraft de-icer (Safewing Type IV): 369 m³
Recycling rate for de-icer used: 59%

See also:
2014 environmental declaration, p. 47.

Key Performance Indicator GRI EN1
Materials used by weight or volume.

De-icers 2013/2014:
Apron de-icers: 1,097 t
Aircraft de-icer (Safewing Type I): 1,939 m³
Aircraft de-icer (Safewing Type IV): 369 m³
Recycling rate for de-icer used: 59%

See also:
2014 environmental declaration, p. 47.

Key Performance Indicator GRI EN3
Direct energy consumption by primary energy source.

Scope 1: direct energy consumption/emissions
Gas/diesel generating sets CHPP: 39,665 t
Gas gas/gasoline generating sets CHPP: 24,346 t
Natural gas boiler plant: 470 t
Fuel oil gas/diesel gensets: 5,811 t
Fuel oil boiler plant: 8 t
LPG: 261 t
Fuel oil emergency gensets: 101 t
Natural gas consumption EFM3: 798 t
= Total: 71,460 t

See also:
2014 environmental declaration, p. 54.

Key Performance Indicator GRI EN8
Total water withdrawal by source.

Water purchased from utility: 1,000,558 m³
Water consumed per traffic unit: 24.1 l

See also:
2014 environmental declaration, p. 48.

The utility company lists the water sources in question.

Since December 2010, FMG has been extracting its own quaternary groundwater for cooling the refrigerators and units used in the block heat and power plant at Munich Airport; this water is then fed into the power station.

Key Performance Indicator GRI EN22
Total weight of waste by type and disposal method.

Waste (disposal method: power plant for energy recovery)
Waste for disposal/prohibited liquids (terminal areas): 179 t
Waste for disposal from buildings: 533 t
Recycling (disposal method: sorting facilities and paper factory/recycling firms)
Paper, cardboard, and cartons from buildings: 1,589 t
Mixed reclaimed materials/waste for recycling from buildings: 2,981 t
Mixed glass: 169 t
Wood: 267 t
Bulk waste: 400 t
Other waste (e.g., films, polystyrene, metals, electric waste): 397 t

Food waste (disposal method: biogas plant for energy recovery): 836 t

Other special waste types/hazardous waste/construction waste and rubble (disposal method: recycling/disposal firms or special waste disposal)
Other special waste types: 310 t
Hazardous waste: 260 t
Construction waste/rubble: 1,026 t
= Total amount: 8,947 t

Greenhouse Gas

13. Climate-Relevant Emissions

13. The company discloses the GHG emissions in accordance with the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol or standards based on it and states the goals it has set itself to reduce emissions.

FMG monitors carbon levels on a systematic basis using its own carbon database and Greenhouse Gas Protocols.

The carbon database is one of the most important elements of carbon management; it is used as a report, management, and control tool for all activities related to the area of carbon reduction and energy efficiency.

FMG has been publishing its carbon footprint in accordance with the requirements of the Greenhouse Gas Protocol since 2008. Emissions are split up into three scopes according to the polluter pays principle. In addition to direct emissions from energy production and transportation (scope 1) and indirect emissions from energy procurement (scope 2), indirect emissions from the business area that the airport offers are also recorded (scope 3).

As part of its climate protection program, Munich Airport uses alternative fuels from renewable energy sources within its vehicle pool. In addition to fuels from renewable raw materials such as vegetable oil and bioethanol, 22 cars now also run on biogas. Since 2013 32 apron buses have borne the “Blue Angel” eco-label, a sign that they are associated with particularly low levels of noise and contaminants.

To reward its commitment to reducing climate-relevant emissions, FMG achieved a top result in the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) in 2014. As well as a transparent overview of the climate protection strategy, the CDP also evaluates climate figures, and the quality and efficiency of carbon reduction measures. After its successful debut in 2013, the company took a leap forwards by making it into the Carbon Performance Leadership Index (CPLI). To be included in the CPLI, a company has to achieve better absolute carbon emissions savings in scope 1 and 2 than the average across all participants in the CDP. With a saving of around 4% in 2014, FMG is the only airport operator in the world to be included. It managed to achieve this by improving its own block heat and power plant and using more efficient lighting and air-conditioning technology.

See also:
• "Strengths 2014" - Integrated Annual Report, p. 73–89, p. 168–181.
• 2014 environmental declaration, p. 54–56.
http://www.munich-airport.de/media/download/general/publikationen/de/umwelterklaerung_2014.pdf

Key Performance Indicators (KPI)

Key Performance Indicator GRI EN16
Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight.

Scope 1: direct greenhouse gas emissions
Total: 83,731 t of CO2

Scope 2: indirect greenhouse gas emissions
Total: 17,539 t of CO2

Scope 3: indirect greenhouse gas emissions associated with the business area that the FMG offers
Total: 524,371 t of CO2

See also:
• Environmental declaration, p. 54–56.
http://www.munich-airport.de/media/download/general/publikationen/de/umwelterklaerung_2014.pdf

Key Performance Indicator GRI EN18
Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved.

FMG’s sustainability program contains measures in the area of environmental and climate protection, which aim to expand environment management, improve resource efficiency, and reduce emissions and the influence of pollutants.

Scope 1:
The main focus during 2014 was on replacing the airport’s own block heat and power plant (CHPP), which generates around half of the electricity and – via cogeneration of heat and power – covers around 70 percent of the heating and cooling requirements. Following the decision by the German Federal Cabinet in January 2014 to cease granting self-sufficient power supply systems a full exemption from the Renewable Energy Act levy (EEG: Renewable Energy Act) from 2015, it was a case of deciding whether to carry out the replacement of the CHPP planned for 2015 within this very short period before the end of 2014 or to renovate the old system for economy’s sake. Ultimately, it was the modern technology used in a new system, which is far more environmentally friendly and enables additional future CO2 reductions of 10,000 tonnes a year, that prompted the decision to invest some 3 million euros in accelerating the project and build a CHP system generating 17 megawatts of electrical power in less than seven months. During the first two weeks of December the four new CHP blocks were already supplying electricity and heat to support the operation of the airport once they had been commissioned in turn. Munich Airport is also constantly looking for potential ways of saving energy across all areas of operation, infrastructure, and traffic on airport premises. An example of this is the conversion during 2014 of the lighting on all aprons and in Hangar 2 to modern LED technology, which only uses about half as much electricity as the previous lights. All told, this will reduce CO2 by some 1,360 tonnes a year in future. A further 150 tonnes or so is to be achieved by reducing the run-on times at baggage conveyor belts.

Scope 2:
Around half of the electricity used at Munich Airport is bought in from an external network operator, which means the emission level associated with the energy mix within the German electricity grid is attributed to the airport in respect of this. Although the proportion of renewable energies has been rising significantly for years in Germany, the contribution made by lignite and hard coal in terms of electricity generation has also been increasing. As a result, the net effect on climate of the energy bought in by Munich Airport between 2011 and 2013 has actually got worse. Having said this, 2014 saw the amount of electricity bought in and the specific emission factor associated with it decrease slightly once more compared with the previous year. The net effect on climate improved by some 4,000 tonnes accordingly. This is more than four times as high as the reductions achieved through the new LED lighting on the aprons. Flughafen München GmbH continues to step up its policy of buying in electricity from renewable sources.

Scope 3:
As far as the energy consumed by airport users is concerned, Flughafen München GmbH developed further climate protection measures during 2014 in conjunction with the airlines and air traffic control. In 2014, the airport made significant investments in pre-conditioned air systems, which supply aircraft standing at the terminal with all their heating and cooling requirements and pilots will no longer have to switch on the auxiliary power units intended for this purpose. The new stationary installations will become operational in 2015 and reduce greenhouse gases by up to 23,500 tonnes a year. Further fuel savings were achieved by improving approach sequences, continuous descent operations (CDO), and reducing the average time spent standing on taxiways.

See also:
• "Strengths 2014" - Integrated Annual Report, p. 73–76.
• Environmental declaration.
http://www.munich-airport.de/media/download/general/publikationen/de/umwelterklaerung_2014.pdf